Caer Dyni Burial Chamber, Criccieth

A small, fairly inconspicuous cromlech but worth a visit for its setting above Criccieth and the added interest of some cupmarks.

Criccieth is an attractive coastal town on the Llyn Peninsula in North Wales and it is best known for its imposing Welsh castle, perched on a rocky headland between the towns two beaches. At the opposite end of the beach from the castle a short walk eastwards takes you towards the cromlech.

The cairn is in a ruinous state and the relatively slim capstone has slipped and is embedded in the ground.

A slight mound stretches out from the western end of the chamber, presumably the remains of material from the long cairn that would have covered it.

The mound on the west side of the chamber

There are cupmarks on two faces of the upright stone supporting the capstone.  Four of them are just visible here but they didn’t come out well in the photo. The rest are on the inside of the chamber and although it was easy to feel them when I ran my hand across the stone it was difficult to get a decent photo.

The burial chamber can be accessed from the main road above or from walking along the beach from the seafront.

If walking down to it from the car park on the main road you can see the cromlech from the western end of the carpark. Walk back down the road until you come to a public footpath leading down the hill. The cromlech isn’t far from the footpath.

Stunning views back to the town and castle and R looking across Tremadog Bay and down the coast.

To approach from the seafront, carry on along the beach until you see a public footpath going across the railway line and follow the path up the hill a little way, veering off to the right to reach the burial chamber.

Criccieth beach and the castle

Walking to Caer Dyni across the beach took longer than I expected because I got distracted by geology and beach combing!
The beach is strewn with huge glacial erratics that have broken away from the soft glacial till in the low cliffs beside this section of the beach.

Above R – An erratic boulder coming loose from the soft glacial till. This boulder was about a metre high and many on the beach were even bigger.

Criccieth Castle
Criccieth Beach

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4 thoughts on “Caer Dyni Burial Chamber, Criccieth

  1. We used to spend family holidays in Criccieth although I was very young so don’t remember it well. The boulders on the beach remind me of those at Moeraki on the Otago coast in New Zealand where we were earlier this year.

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  2. Your pictures tempt me to explore this area having never been on the Llyn Peninsula, but it will have to wait until the New Year. Interesting! Thank you.

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